More tips from top casting directors

Award Winning Composer/Lyricist

“Make your performance a conversation. Many people sing well, but fewer really communicate when they’re singing and communication is all about the other person in the conversation. Most likely, you’re standing up there by yourself, singing alone. But treat your song as a scene. Think of it as a dialogue we only hear half of, that you don’t know what’s coming next. Making your song feel like a series of moment-to-moment interactions will set you apart in a big way.”

Most likely, you’re standing up there by yourself, singing alone.

But treat your song as a scene. Think of it as a dialogue we only hear half of, that you don’t know what’s coming next. Making your song feel like a series of moment-to-moment interactions will set you apart in a big way.”

Adam Gwon was named one of “50 to Watch” by The Dramatist magazine and hailed “a promising newcomer to our talent-hungry musical theater” by The New York Times. For the latest news about Adam’s music and performances, go to www.adamgwon.com


Director & Music Associate Professor NYUSteinhardt: Program in Vocal Performance

“In my experience, singers who are preparing for an audition tend to spend too much time worrying about what the “people behind the table” want to hear. Most auditions come with basic instructions what kind of singing, what genre of music, how long a piece and once you have met those criteria the best thing you can do is choose a song that you really like to sing. When you audition with material that you feel good about material that also says something you want to say you are going to be able to share much more of yourself with the people who are watching and hearing you. People conducting auditions certainly want to hear your best singing, but at the same time they want to get a sense of who you are. Think of an audition as a way of introducing yourself to people who really do want to meet you. The best way to do that is to present material that you know well and enjoy singing. “
For more inspiration, check out William’s book, Dramatic Circumstances: On Acting, Singing, and Living Inside the Stories We Tell : www.dramaticcircumstances.com

Award winning Casting Director/Author

Don’t distract people in the waiting room. Be considerate and professional. Once in the audition room, sing a song that shows your competitive money notes. If the role calls for a high E, sing a song that shows you are trained and qualified to sing that note eight times a week. Sing songs you love, that make you happy. You want to leave your audition feeling like you did the best job you can. Then leave the audition and get on with your day!

Jen Rudin is an award-winning casting director and author of “Confessions of a Casting Director: Help Actors Land Any Role with Secrets from Inside the Audition Room.” (Harper Collins/It Books, 2013). Visit www.jenrudin.com and follow @RudinJen


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